Monday, November 14, 2005

Blogging commitment

I must start off by apologizing for not posting any entries for the last few weeks. It's been hectic at work but I think I need to at least commit to posting at least one entry per week. When I first started this, it was a means for me to let off some steam and vent but as more and more folks start reading the blog, it became more of a commitment than I expected. Anyhow, from hereon, I will try my best to post on a more regular basis.

I've been keeping up on some stuff and also reading up on subjects that I'm not familiar with but have some responsibility in ensuring that it runs (for example, SAN). We have been experiencing problems with our SAN (IBM storage, FalconStor and HP-UX combo) and I've been reading SAN for Dummies. So far, couple of things that me; The first one was this statement, "To store information, the computer uses a series of eight bits, or one byte of data. A byte is eight characters of data. Therefore, it takes eight bits to make a byte. The letter A is store on your computer as a byte of data." Hmm, I still don't get it. The other one was the words, "fibre" vs "fiber" and how it was the French who uses "fibre". Hmmm, I think "fibre" is the right term (i.e. Queen English) all that.

Another thing that came to my attention was this headline from ZDnet, Tsunami Hacker" which seems to be a over-reaction to hacking based on new legislation. I mean if all the guy did was to browse the directories (since they were left open), I don't think that's hacking at all. It like saying that I have an open house and folks came in and started opening doors to check out the house and I can charge them with B & E if they open doors to rooms that I want to keep shut but not locked. How do they tell the difference between what was allowed and not (if doors to both are shut and not locked)?

2 comments:

Anonymous said...

It like saying that I have an open house and folks came in and started opening doors to check out the house and I can charge them with B & E if they open doors to rooms that I want to keep shut but not locked. How do they tell the difference between what was allowed and not (if doors to both are shut and not locked)?

It doesn't matter how they know, what matters is their intent.

Peter K said...

anonymous said...
It doesn't matter how they know, what matters is their intent.


Very true.